rushthatspeaks: (Default)
I'm sick today, so this is a short book from the big box [personal profile] octopedingenue sent.

The tagline on the cover reads "Yet another troll-fighting eleven-year-old Orthodox Jewish girl", and yes, this is an addition to the nascent genre (TM Michael Chabon) of Jews With Swords. Well, one sword.

This is a graphic novel very plainly aimed at early elementary school students, but it doesn't talk down. The story is fairly basic-- our heroine, Mirka, wants to slay dragons-- but not told in exactly the way one expects (her stepmother's reaction to this is 'Isn't killing a dragon attacking a symptom while ignoring root ecological causes?'). In addition, it achieves a layer of ambiguities that I find interesting by reserving judgment on the role of women in Orthodox Judaism entirely. The status quo is what it is and it's shown as on occasion both a good and a bad thing for Mirka.

And the plot is going along merrily, and then it stops for a while because it's Shabbat, and you can't have plot on Shabbat.

So I liked this, although it feels very young for me, and at eleven I would probably have loved it. At the moment, some of its ambiguities cause me feminist twitching, but, you know, I do much prefer a text that attempts to accurately represent something to a text that explicitly says 'xyz is good' or 'xyz is evil' without making sure you are aware, first, of what xyz is. I do, with this subject matter, know what xyz is, so I'd have preferred a little more engagement, but that is partly because I'm, you know, not eleven, so there it is.

You can comment here or at the Dreamwidth crosspost. There are comment count unavailable comments over there.
rushthatspeaks: (Default)
I'm sick today, so this is a short book from the big box [personal profile] octopedingenue sent.

The tagline on the cover reads "Yet another troll-fighting eleven-year-old Orthodox Jewish girl", and yes, this is an addition to the nascent genre (TM Michael Chabon) of Jews With Swords. Well, one sword.

This is a graphic novel very plainly aimed at early elementary school students, but it doesn't talk down. The story is fairly basic-- our heroine, Mirka, wants to slay dragons-- but not told in exactly the way one expects (her stepmother's reaction to this is 'Isn't killing a dragon attacking a symptom while ignoring root ecological causes?'). In addition, it achieves a layer of ambiguities that I find interesting by reserving judgment on the role of women in Orthodox Judaism entirely. The status quo is what it is and it's shown as on occasion both a good and a bad thing for Mirka.

And the plot is going along merrily, and then it stops for a while because it's Shabbat, and you can't have plot on Shabbat.

So I liked this, although it feels very young for me, and at eleven I would probably have loved it. At the moment, some of its ambiguities cause me feminist twitching, but, you know, I do much prefer a text that attempts to accurately represent something to a text that explicitly says 'xyz is good' or 'xyz is evil' without making sure you are aware, first, of what xyz is. I do, with this subject matter, know what xyz is, so I'd have preferred a little more engagement, but that is partly because I'm, you know, not eleven, so there it is.

Profile

rushthatspeaks: (Default)
rushthatspeaks

June 2017

S M T W T F S
    123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
252627282930 

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Jun. 26th, 2017 10:31 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios