rushthatspeaks: (Default)
As it says on the label. This is a manual about how to set up a system to have worms produce Really Nutritious Compost. It covers things like how to build a bin to hold the worms, what kind of bedding you should use, what species of worm to use, what you can feed them, how many worms to buy for what amount of garbage, and so on. Basically, if you can think of a logistical detail that might be relevant about keeping a worm-compost bin, it's in here, including a note that you must not let your cats use the bin as a litterbox and the author's personal tips for getting rid of possible fruit flies. (She says that if you put beer in your fruit fly traps, they will be attracted to it but it will kill them, as opposed to, say, cider vinegar water or fruit juices, which have the potential to let them breed. The difficulty I see is that this requires having beer around, and not only that but beer you do not intend to consume.)

And she goes into the science behind worms and their ecosystems and the mineral content of the worm castings and so on. And there are cute illustrations.

The whole thing is written at a level which doesn't talk down to an adult, but which could, I think, be comprehended by a bright third-grader, which is nice.

The main conclusion I drew, mind you, is that even though a worm system requires substantial maintenance only every three to four months, it slots neatly into the area of my mind labeled Too Much Work For How Serious We Are About Gardening Right Now. We have a compost heap already, which seems to be thriving, and even has things living in it-- granted, those things are fire ants, and we want them evicted stat, but they certainly seem happy. If we ever need really high-grade compost for some reason this might be worth thinking about, but honestly it isn't something my household would find terribly useful. If we get around to that vegetable garden, perhaps.

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rushthatspeaks: (Default)
As it says on the label. This is a manual about how to set up a system to have worms produce Really Nutritious Compost. It covers things like how to build a bin to hold the worms, what kind of bedding you should use, what species of worm to use, what you can feed them, how many worms to buy for what amount of garbage, and so on. Basically, if you can think of a logistical detail that might be relevant about keeping a worm-compost bin, it's in here, including a note that you must not let your cats use the bin as a litterbox and the author's personal tips for getting rid of possible fruit flies. (She says that if you put beer in your fruit fly traps, they will be attracted to it but it will kill them, as opposed to, say, cider vinegar water or fruit juices, which have the potential to let them breed. The difficulty I see is that this requires having beer around, and not only that but beer you do not intend to consume.)

And she goes into the science behind worms and their ecosystems and the mineral content of the worm castings and so on. And there are cute illustrations.

The whole thing is written at a level which doesn't talk down to an adult, but which could, I think, be comprehended by a bright third-grader, which is nice.

The main conclusion I drew, mind you, is that even though a worm system requires substantial maintenance only every three to four months, it slots neatly into the area of my mind labeled Too Much Work For How Serious We Are About Gardening Right Now. We have a compost heap already, which seems to be thriving, and even has things living in it-- granted, those things are fire ants, and we want them evicted stat, but they certainly seem happy. If we ever need really high-grade compost for some reason this might be worth thinking about, but honestly it isn't something my household would find terribly useful. If we get around to that vegetable garden, perhaps.

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