rushthatspeaks: (Default)
[personal profile] rushthatspeaks
After yesterday I wanted something I knew I would like.

This is the least of the Jarman I've read so far, since a lot of it is collected interviews, which means that some of the material repeats itself and some of the interviewers ask really stupid questions. (e.g.: Interviewer: You were telling me why you don't regret no longer being promiscuous-- Jarman: No, you were telling me why I shouldn't regret no longer being promiscuous.)

Also, more than his diaries this is a set of meditations on the films he was making at the time of writing, as opposed to about his personal life, and I have not yet seen the films of this period, post-Caravaggio and pre-Edward II. The principal one of these films is The Last of England, and it is clear that a) Jarman considered it his masterpiece and b) it tongue-tied him, he couldn't talk about it, he said what he had to say in it and when trying to explain it he goes into sentence fragments and heaps of broken images and bricolage of Ezra Pound and William Blake in a blender. It's very entertaining and ludicrously erudite but I have no idea what he means. Maybe after seeing it those chunks of book will make more sense, but I am not betting on that.

But around the edges there are some lovely things, descriptions of things he likes and doesn't about other directors, of a trip to Moscow and south to the Caspian Sea, of the experience of the couple of times he acted in films instead of directing them (both times playing real people, a painter he knew and a director he admires: I may have to hunt down the film in which he plays Pier Paolo Pasolini, being buried in a muddy desert at four in the morning).

So. Not a book for people unfamiliar with Jarman as a director, or possibly even as a writer. But I liked it. It has all his facets, rage and irony and humor and endless benevolence and brilliance.

Date: 2011-03-09 03:56 pm (UTC)
sovay: (Default)
From: [personal profile] sovay
(both times playing real people, a painter he knew and a director he admires: I may have to hunt down the film in which he plays Pier Paolo Pasolini, being buried in a muddy desert at four in the morning).

Someone had put clips of it up on YouTube, but they had also vidded it to Coil's "Ostia (The Death of Pasolini)." This probably is the existentially correct music, but since I couldn't find any evidence that the filmmakers had actually used it, I'm waiting until I can find the original short film.

You need a Jarman-related icon.

Date: 2011-03-12 08:40 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] rushthatspeaks.livejournal.com
I know Coil did the soundtrack to one of the later Jarmans, so it probably is existentially right.

I do need an icon. Hell if I know what, though.

Date: 2011-03-13 08:37 pm (UTC)
sovay: (Default)
From: [personal profile] sovay
I know Coil did the soundtrack to one of the later Jarmans, so it probably is existentially right.

They did The Angelic Conversation and Blue. Throbbing Gristle did In the Shadow of the Sun.

I do need an icon. Hell if I know what, though.

I know I want one from Wittgenstein; maybe also The Tempest, in which case I should screencap Ariel for you. Anything from Edward II would need text, which I don't know how to add in. Tilda Swinton in Caravaggio?

(The thing about Wittgenstein is that I've been fond of him, historically, for several years now. It's just the combination of you and Karl Johnson that seems to have kicked him into other regions of my brain. I am amused and suspect he would have been horrified.)

Date: 2011-03-14 03:50 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] rushthatspeaks.livejournal.com
I can add text, badly, if you send me pictures you want it on. I would very much love Ariel screencaps.

Clancy Chassay in Serious Writer mode would make a good Wittgenstein icon. I should see if I can find a suitable picture.

Date: 2011-03-14 06:47 am (UTC)
sovay: (Default)
From: [personal profile] sovay
I should see if I can find a suitable picture.

This one any use to you?

Date: 2011-03-11 11:05 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] sorenlundi.livejournal.com
I'm a Jarman fan, but I couldn't make it all the way through The Last of England.

This is mostly because I tried to watch it two hours before it expired from Netflix 'watch it now,' even though I really wasn't in the mood for something with no discernable narative. From the first fourty minutes 'heaps of broken images and bricolage of Ezra Pound and William Blake in a blender' sounds about right. I did enjoy the similarly narativeless Angelic Conversation, which I watched with friends, but what I most remember is that after being charmed but only vaguely engaged with the film, all of us were absolutely rivited by the interview included with the DVD extras.

I shall also have to hunt down the film in which he plays Pasolini, who is another one of my favourite directors. Have you seen Teorema?

Date: 2011-03-12 08:39 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] rushthatspeaks.livejournal.com
I suspect I am going to need to be in the correct mood for The Last of England. Having a deadline would kill a lot of movies, honestly.

Ooh, that interview sounds like a thing I look forward to very much.

I have not actually seen any Pasolini, due to having as a teenager run across the wrong neorealists and thinking I didn't like neorealism at all. I turn out to have been incorrect about this, so Pasolini is pretty high up my to-watch list. Which one is Teorema?

Date: 2011-03-13 10:01 pm (UTC)
sovay: (I Claudius)
From: [personal profile] sovay
I turn out to have been incorrect about this, so Pasolini is pretty high up my to-watch list. Which one is Teorema?

It has Terence Stamp and the synopsis makes me wonder if Dennis Potter saw it before he wrote Brimstone and Treacle (1976), or if it was just slow-burning zeitgeist.

Medea (1969) with Maria Callas is the Pasolini I've wanted to see for years. Naturally, I have never found it on DVD. He also did a version of Oedipus Rex (1967).

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